Eskew+Dumez+Ripple
Eskew+Dumez+Ripple Projects to Receive Louisiana Landmarks Society Awards for Excellence in Historic Preservation

Eskew+Dumez+Ripple Projects to Receive Louisiana Landmarks Society Awards for Excellence in Historic Preservation

The Louisiana Landmarks Society (LLS)—the state’s oldest nonprofit preservation organization established in 1950—recently announced the winners of the 2015 Louisiana Landmarks Society Awards for Excellence in Historic Preservation. Given annually, these awards recognize projects completed in Orleans Parish (outside of the French Quarter) which best demonstrate the importance of historic preservation as a creative, ‘green,’ and sustainable tool for revitalizing older neighborhoods; and celebrate new construction that is sensitively integrated into its historic surroundings.

Eskew+Dumez+Ripple will receive four awards for their contributions to the following projects:

Tulane School of Social Work / 127 Elk Place

A neo-classical structure built in 1917 now houses the School of Social Work in a repurposed space that balances old and new design, safety and security with user need, program and institutional identity.

Former Pan American Insurance Company / 2400 Canal Street

The mid-century design building is listed individually on the National Register of Historic Places as a significant representation of post-World War II International Style architecture. After being out of service and an eyesore for years, it functions today as the administration building for the new VA Hospital.

Myrtle Banks Redevelopment / 1307 Oretha Castle Haley Boulevard

Repurposed to meet the contemporary needs of the surrounding neighborhood, the Myrtle Banks School Building—built in 1910 and ravaged by fire in 2008—has been converted into a 23,000-square-foot public food market with office space for small businesses and nonprofits in one of New Orleans’ historic neighborhoods.

The George and Joyce Wein Jazz & Heritage Center / 1225 N. Rampart Street

The Center was once two separate townhomes later combined in the early 20th century. The classical detailing of the façade and interior floor plan remained relatively untouched and interior spaces were updated for optimal acoustics and energy savings. The rear half of the building was completely rebuilt as modern performance space for the New Orleans Jazz + Heritage Festival and Foundation.

For more information about this year’s winning projects, please visit: http://www.louisianalandmarks.org/events/awards-excellence-historic-preservation